Monday, January 4, 2016

Google Apps Certified Deployment Specialist

Back in November last year, the Apps Services Partner that I help with Google Apps Support told me that I was required to take the Google Apps for Work Deployment Specialist certification exam. I learned that Google was going to end the certification program and that I had to take the exam January 5, 2016. It turns out that they were simplifying the Partner Credential Program. All good!

So I took a crash review during the holiday break, read through all Google Apps for Work help articles I could get my hands on, and did self-study on Google Apps Administrator Fundamentals and Deployment Essentials.

I thought I could wing it with an hour or two of readings each day. Turns out that I had to read, practice, read some more, and recall deployments I was involved in. It was very humbling because I thought I knew a lot, and that if I made sure I understood different deployment use cases, I'd be fine. Boy, was I wrong. I was pulling at my hair trying to recall concepts and best practices around:
  • Mail delivery architectures
  • Directory Sync and user provisioning from LDAP servers
  • Data migration from Microsoft Exchange, IBM Notes and Domino, and IMAP sources
  • Configuration and support for mobile devices
  • Security features like SSO, SSL, and compliance settings
It took me 84 gruelling minutes to complete the exam, with the proctor stopping the exam a couple of times for camera adjustments. I got too frazzled that I didn't realize I passed the exam because right after I turned it in, the assessing system immediately presented my certificate and badge; and it took a while for that to sink in.

Let me know if your company wants to transition to using Google Apps as your email, collaboration, and productivity solution.

Monday, August 17, 2015

On Planning and Reports

In my previous employment, I didn't have any problems with submitting reports, practically because we used a time management/monitoring tool and the reports sort of generated by themselves. So when submitting daily reports isn't the norm here at the unit, quarterly reports become quite tricky.

I've resorted to referring to Google Calendar as most of the stuff we do are usually scheduled. I've also thought of logging everything on a text file and have pelican publish this to my website.

Meantime, my reading list for the day as I decide on a workflow that will allow multiple teams to work on the university website:
  • http://www.sitepoint.com/one-click-app-deployment-server-side-git-hooks/
  • http://stackoverflow.com/questions/425692/what-is-your-preferred-php-deployment-strategy
  • https://www.digitalocean.com/community/tutorials/how-to-automate-php-app-deployment-process-using-capistrano-on-ubuntu-13

Thursday, April 30, 2015

Moving Forward

In a month's time, I would be transferring offices again. I started from a very technical department, under the administration cluster. A year and about 3 months later, I was given the privilege to transfer to one of the most influential and authoritative departments in the academic cluster. It was still a split engagement, with me going back and forth these two offices.

And for almost 2 years, I improved processes, handled, battled, and took care of hundreds of scenarios, cases, and situations that seem to always come with the university seasons. I became cognizant of academic procedures and with this knowledge came the understanding of many realities that I vowed to try to fix, given the chance, and if I can.

I will miss being up to my neck deep in operations and in SLMIS. But I think I will miss more being in the company of great people who, inspite of erecting a facade of sternness in all their dealings, turned out to be really cool and happy persons. I will always have their friendship and can always count on them even if I would no longer spend most of the day with them.

Movement is good. But moving forward is always better because you can always look back and see everything you've done. :D

Friday, February 27, 2015

Engineering, I.T., Business Management, and Technopreneurship


technopreneurship
By 2016, five higher education institutes (HEIs) here in the Philippines will be integrating Technopreneurship as an offered elective for their Engineering programs. I am quite thankful that the higher education authorities have included my alma mater. More than being the center of trade in Northern Mindanao, the strategic location of our city makes it the best option for I.T. companies to build or expand in.

While the article specifically mentions entrepeneurship training for future engineers and that inclusion will be done in the Engineering curricula of 5 HEIs, I feel that this is severely limiting the beneficiaries (e.g. the graduates, and ultimately, the HEIs) of this inclusion.

The scope of Technopreneurship demands its inclusion not only in Engineering programs, but in Business Management (Business Administration, Financial Management, etc) and Computer Science (Information Management, Software Engineering, etc) as well.

On the other hand, I think these may just be preliminaries. After these initial inclusions, other relevant programs may be lined up for inclusion/integration. The higher education authorities will continue to leverage priority programs in Science, Technology, Engineering, Agriculture and Mathematics (STEAM), which are critical for the country's development.
Source: @inquirerdotnet

Wednesday, February 25, 2015

Apple Announces MacBook Pro Repair Extension Program for Video Issues


I didn't think there was going to be any hope for my early 2011 MacBook Pro, which had GPU-related problems after only about a year of use. The only obvious option I had was to buy a replacement laptop. But Apple seems to have been receiving a lot of reports that they've launched a repair progam that will fix the graphics problem for free.

If you bought a 15-inch or 17-inch MacBook Pro between early 2011 and end of 2013, as well as the first two generations of the Retina models, you're in luck. The program became available to the US and Canada last February 20, and would be available to other countries by February 27.
These are the affected models:
  • MacBook Pro (15-inch Early 2011)
  • MacBook Pro (15-inch, Late 2011)
  • MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Mid 2012)
  • MacBook Pro (17-inch Early 2011)
  • MacBook Pro (17-inch Late 2011)
  • MacBook Pro (Retina, 15 inch, Early 2013)

Not sure if your model is included in the list of affected products? Use this Check your Coverage tool on the Apple Support site.

Sunday, February 1, 2015

Got Static!

I just made the first step towards moving my whole blog to GitHub and going all static! Content is generated by Pelican, a static site generator, written in Python. Why GitHub, you ask? While I can always push the static content to any of my existing web hosts, there's a touch of geekness in writing using my favorite editor and publishing by git commits and pushes; thus GitHub.

Also, it's this year that I'm planning to pick up Python programming again, for devops reasons. I don't actually remember the last time I was this excited to post an update!

Google Apps Certified Deployment Specialist

Back in November last year, the Apps Services Partner that I help with Google Apps Support told me that I was required to take the Google Ap...